Publications Database

Welcome to the new Schulich Peer-Reviewed Publication Database!

The database is currently in beta-testing and will be updated with more features as time goes on. In the meantime, stakeholders are free to explore our faculty’s numerous works. The left-hand panel affords the ability to search by the following:

  • Faculty Member’s Name;
  • Area of Expertise;
  • Whether the Publication is Open-Access (free for public download);
  • Journal Name; and
  • Date Range.

At present, the database covers publications from 2012 to 2020, but will extend further back in the future. In addition to listing publications, the database includes two types of impact metrics: Altmetrics and Plum. The database will be updated annually with most recent publications from our faculty.

If you have any questions or input, please don’t hesitate to get in touch.

 

Search Results

Lévesque, M. and U. Stephan (2020). "It’s Time We Talk about Time in Entrepreneurship", Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice, 44(2), 163-184.

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Abstract This editorial draws attention to time to advance entrepreneurship research by focusing on two aspects of time—time perspective and time management. We initiate a deeper conversation on time in entrepreneurship and illustrate the value of a time-based lens for entrepreneurship research through discussing examples at the individual, firm and context levels. These examples consider underdog and portfolio entrepreneurs; well-being; social and unethical entrepreneurial behavior; entrepreneurial teams and entrepreneur–investor dyads; firm strategy; industry and cultural contexts. We review promising methods for time-conscious entrepreneurship research: process, true longitudinal, diary, experience sampling, observational, work-shadowing and time-use studies; historical approaches; experiments; and simulations.

Fischer, E. and Maciel, A. (2020). "Collaborative Market Driving: How Peer Firms Can Develop Markets Through Collective Action", Journal of Marketing, 84(5), 41-59 .

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Abstract Firms often aim to develop markets as part of their long-term strategies. Conventionally, research in marketing has explained this complex process by stressing firms’ efforts to outdo their peers. While this emphasis is valuable, it overlooks the role of another major force in market evolution: collective action among peer firms. To address this oversight, this article conceptualizes “collaborative market driving,” defining it as the collective strategy in which peer firms consistently cooperate among themselves and with other actors to develop markets in ways that increase their overall competitiveness. This conceptualization includes the triggers that lead peer firms to mobilize for collective action and coalesce with other market actors; it also identifies how this coalition converts collective resources into market-driving power. These theoretical contributions, based on a multimethod analysis of the rise of U.S. craft breweries, offer an alternative course of action for firms interested in driving new markets when they lack adequate resources to do so individually.

Lévesque, M. and N. Joglekar (2018). "Guest Editorial: Resource, Routine, Reputation or Regulation Shortages: Can Data- and Analytics-driven Capabilities Inform Tech Entrepreneur Decisions?", IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management, 65(4), 537-544.

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Abstract The five papers in this special section explore the use of data analytics in current business and management decision making. Entrepreneurial ingenuity plays a crucial role in building new business enterprises, especially when resources are lacking, routines are nonexistent, a firm’s reputation is not established, and/or regulations are inadequate. Resources in the form of human capital are often the foundation of independent startups or new corporate business ventures. Routines in the form of organizational and technical processes are often key in building these new ventures. Reputation in terms of an entrepreneur’s accomplishments or network is essential for acquiring needed resources and developing fundamental routines to initiate, commit to, organize, and grow the startup. Examines the impacts of such shortages create threats or opportunities for independent startups and new business ventures spun off from established firms.

Tan, D. and Tan, J. (2017). "Far from the Tree? Do Private Entrepreneurs Agglomerate Around Public Sector Incumbents During Economic Transition?", Organization Science, 28(1), 113-132.

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Bhatt, B., Kistruck, G. and Qureshi, I. (2016). "The Enabling and Constraining Effects of Social Ties in the Process of Institutional Entrepreneurship", Organization Studies, 37(3), 425-447.

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Abstract While the past decade has produced a number of insights into the process of institutional change, scholars still lack a comprehensive understanding of the germinal stages of institutional entrepreneurship. More specifically, further knowledge is needed into what factors cause certain individuals to initiate norm-breaking behaviour while others continue to adhere to societal expectations. Prior work seeking to inform this question has focused either on individual-level or environmental-level explanations. Comparatively, we employ a social network perspective as a ‘meso-level’ lens into the space where actors and their environment intersect. Based upon our qualitative findings, we propose that social ties can serve as an important factor in enabling (heterophilic ties) as well as constraining (homophilic ties) institutional change. However, our data also suggest that these network forces are highly dynamic and contingent upon tie frequency, the sequencing of tie contact, and the prevailing social norms in which tie contact takes place.

Cumming, D., Fischer, E. and Peridis, T. (2015). "Publicly Funded Business Advisory Services and Entrepreneurial Internationalization", International Small Business Journal, 33(8), 824-839.

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Abstract This article examines whether and how publicly sponsored advisory services can encourage small and medium-sized firms to increase their degree of internationalization. We argue that professional advisors have an impact upon the knowledge and skills firms develop to enhance internationalization. The data examined are drawn from a publicly funded organization providing advisory services to entrepreneurial firms; they show a significant relationship between receipt of advice and the development of internationalization-related knowledge and competences. Knowledge, competences, and advice are all significant predictors that firms will adopt strategies conducive to initiating or expanding internationalization. Moreover, the results suggest that various forms of advisory services should be explicitly considered in assessing the factors which contribute to dynamic capabilities. However, pertinent public policy initiatives should incorporate performance metrics that capture the impact of such advisory services in enhancing the internationalization capabilities of entrepreneurial firms.

Cumming, D., Fischer, E. and Peridis, T. (2015). "Publicly Funded Business Advisory Services and Entrepreneurial Internationalization", International Small Business Journal, 33(8), 824-839.

Open Access Download

Abstract This article examines whether and how publicly sponsored advisory services can encourage small and medium-sized firms to increase their degree of internationalization. We argue that professional advisors have an impact upon the knowledge and skills firms develop to enhance internationalization. The data examined are drawn from a publicly funded organization providing advisory services to entrepreneurial firms; they show a significant relationship between receipt of advice and the development of internationalization-related knowledge and competences. Knowledge, competences, and advice are all significant predictors that firms will adopt strategies conducive to initiating or expanding internationalization. Moreover, the results suggest that various forms of advisory services should be explicitly considered in assessing the factors which contribute to dynamic capabilities. However, pertinent public policy initiatives should incorporate performance metrics that capture the impact of such advisory services in enhancing the internationalization capabilities of entrepreneurial firms.

Narayanan, M., and M. Lévesque (2014). "Venture Capital Deals: Belief and Ownership", IEEE Transactions on Engineering Management, 61(4), 570-582.

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Abstract We use a principal-agent model to examine how venture capitalists can determine the ownership division when fund-seeking entrepreneurs possess private information on their disutility of effort. This situation is especially applicable to early-stage first-time entrepreneurs seeking funding, since no history exists on their potential performance. The venture capitalist must thus consider this private information by forming a belief on the entrepreneur's effort level toward the proposed investment opportunity. Formal modeling enables us to describe how the deal process unfolds and to build a simulation. We then identify a unique investor's belief and resulting ownership sharing that maximizes the return to the entrepreneur, one that maximizes the return to the venture capitalist, as well as one that maximizes the deal welfare. We also conjecture an ordering relationship between these critical beliefs and between their resulting ownership allocations. Furthermore, we identify conditions under which the venture capitalist should choose to revise the investment offer if rejected by the entrepreneur. This paper thus moves us closer to a comprehensive theory of venture investment decisions.

Madhok, A. and Marques, R. (2014). "Towards an Action-Based Perspective on Firm Competitiveness", Business Research Quarterly, 17(2), 77-81.

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Abstract Existing theoretical frameworks typically revolve around sustainability of competitive advantage and attribute superior firm performance to its position in the industry structure and/or the possession of critical resources. However, the equilibrium-oriented logic implicit in these perspectives is not consonant with today's environment, characterized by more dynamic and complex behavior of markets and firms, which renders competitive advantages obsolete faster than ever. We propose an alternative action-based perspective on firm competitiveness one that revolves around the logic of action and emphasizes an entrepreneurial orientation and firm agility as the basis of firm competitiveness. This logic of action shifts the focus away from just industry position or resource possession and provides more scope for less advantaged firms to compete with the incumbents.

Tan, J., Shao, Y. and Li, W. (2013). "To Be Different, or To Be the Same? An Exploratory Study of Isomorphism in the Cluster", Journal of Business Venturing, 28(1), 83-97.

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Abstract Entrepreneurial firms are argued to struggle between being different and being the same. To join the debate, we asked this question: How can entrepreneurial firms in a geographically concentrated locale gain both competitive advantage and legitimacy, given the competitive pressures for differentiation and the institutional pressures for conformity? Drawing from the network perspective, we conducted the research in a furniture cluster in Southwestern China. Based on qualitative and quantitative data, we found that peripheral firms tended to be institutionally and competitively isomorphic, while central firms could avoid the tradeoff between institutional conformity and competitive differentiation by creating and using their networks to innovate and at the same time to shape the institutional environment.