Publications Database

Welcome to the new Schulich Peer-Reviewed Publication Database!

The database is currently in beta-testing and will be updated with more features as time goes on. In the meantime, stakeholders are free to explore our faculty’s numerous works. The left-hand panel affords the ability to search by the following:

  • Faculty Member’s Name;
  • Area of Expertise;
  • Whether the Publication is Open-Access (free for public download);
  • Journal Name; and
  • Date Range.

At present, the database covers publications from 2012 to 2020, but will extend further back in the future. In addition to listing publications, the database includes two types of impact metrics: Altmetrics and Plum. The database will be updated annually with most recent publications from our faculty.

If you have any questions or input, please don’t hesitate to get in touch.

 

Search Results

Belk, R. (2014). "You Are What You Can Access: Sharing and Collaborative Consumption Online", Journal of Business Research, 67(8), 1595-1600.

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Abstract Sharing is a phenomenon as old as humankind, while collaborative consumption and the “sharing economy” are phenomena born of the Internet age. This paper compares sharing and collaborative consumption and finds that both are growing in popularity today. Examples are given and an assessment is made of the reasons for the current growth in these practices and their implications for businesses still using traditional models of sales and ownership. The old wisdom that we are what we own, may need modifying to consider forms of possession and uses that do not involve ownership.

Belk, R. (2014). "Sharing Versus Pseudo-Sharing in Web 2.0", The Anthropologist, 18(1), 50.

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Abstract The Internet has opened up a new era in sharing. There has also been an explosion of studies and writings about sharing via the Internet. This includes a series of books, articles, and web discussions on the topic. However, many of these apparent cases of sharing are better characterized as pseudo-sharing — commodity exchanges wrapped in a vocabulary of sharing. The present paper reviews subsequent research and theorizing as well as controversies that have emerged surrounding sharing and what is best regarded as pseudo-sharing — a wolf-insheep’s-clothing phenomenon whereby commodity exchange and potential exploitation of consumer co-creators present themselves in the guise of sharing. The paper begins with a pair of vignettes that highlight some of the contested meanings of sharing. By detailing four types of pseudo-sharing and four types of sharing that are specifically enabled or enhanced by Internet technologies, the paper argues that pseudo-sharing is distinguished by the presence of profit motives, the absence of feelings of community, and expectations of reciprocity. It concludes with a discussion of theoretical, practical, and ethical implications of pseudo-sharing and offer suggestions for future research.

Valente, M. (2012). "Indigenous Resource and Institutional Capital: The Role of Local Context in Embedding sustainable Development", Business & Society, 51(3), 409-449.

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Abstract Although scholars agree that local context is critical in a firm’s commitment to sustainable development, questions remain about how this context plays a role in achieving simultaneous goals of sustainable community development and firm strategic success. By sampling two groups of firms differentiated according to their adoption of a weak or strong orientation to sustainable development, this author searched for relevant explanations from the local context that help to answer this very question. Results point to indigenous resource and institutional capital, the combination of which assists the firm in its ability to embed sustainable development. Whereas more tangible forms of capital assist in the strategy implementation process, less tangible forms of capital influence the strategy formulation process. What is more, firms tended to progress sequentially in the appropriation of these forms of capital as a result of the strengthening of the relationship with contextual stakeholders.